Journal Articles

 

pdf-iconVorster, C.; Roos, V.; Beukes, M. 2013. A Psycho-Diagnostic Tool for Psychotherapy: Interactional Pattern Analysis (IPA). Journal of Psychology in Africa, 23 (3): 163-170.
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This article proposes a description of a psycho-diagnostic tool for psychotherapists, the Interactional Pattern Analysis (IPA). Sixteen interpersonal variables are proposed to describe the observable behaviour that constitutes a client’s interpersonal style within the context of a particular relationship, such as client-therapist; husband-wife; mother-daughter; friends: context; definition of the relationship; clarity of self-presentation; emotional distance; accurate empathy; congruence and unconditional acceptance; confirmation; expression of needs; linear/circular approach; degree of interpersonal flexibility/rigidity; ability to meta-communicate; adequacy of problem-solving skills; control; potential for eliciting rejection or acceptance; and traumatic incidents. In the context of the psychotherapeutic relationship, trained psychotherapists observe clients’ interpersonal styles based on a combination of these interpersonal variables with the intention of proposing a link between clients’ patterns of behaviour and their presenting complaints. Based on this connection, appropriate psychotherapeutic interventions can be implemented.

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Phipps, W.D; Vorster, C. 2011. Narrative Therapy – A return to the intrapsychic perspective. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 23: 128-147.  Click here to download PDF

In investigating narrative therapy, a development within the field of family therapy, it was found that this approach, which is informed by postmodernism, places a strong emphasis on the interpretation of the individual’s subjective experience. This emphasis is consistent with an intrapsychic perspective—an earlier development in clinical psychology and psychotherapy—that is distinct from the subsequent interpsychic perspective adopted by general system theory. Furthermore, narrative therapy bears some resemblance to a number of former developments within the intrapsychic tradition. Thus, it appears that narrative therapy involves a return to the intrapsychic perspective. It is suggested that distinguishing between the intrapsychic and interpsychic frames of reference may help therapists in the field of family therapy, whether their choice of metaphor is narrative or otherwise, to observe and describe with even greater acuity.

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Vorster, C. 1981. Marital Therapy and the “Process of communication”. Psychotherapeia, 7 (2): 2-4
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